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Thread: Learn English by Phonics

  1. #1

    Default Learn English by Phonics

    Basic phonics alphabet

    Learn English by Phonics-screen-shot-2016-03-26-at-7-23-30-pm-png
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  2. #2

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Lessons One

    Sometimes big words are made up of too small words:

    can not

    cobweb = cob + web

    backpack = back + pack

    sandbox = sand + box
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  3. #3

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Lesson Two

    We we talk about "lent" letters, we mean two or three letter just belong together.

    dr/op
    cr/a/sh
    spr/i/ng

    There are three letters between the vowels in this word, but these two letters (dr) belong together they are "lent". So we split the word between "m" and the "d".

    gumdrop = gum + drop

    hundred = hun + dred
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  4. #4

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Lesson Three

    Spiting big words into smaller parts works even when the big word isn't made up of two smaller words.

    tennis = ten + nis

    rabbit = rab + bit

    The two consonants are different, but when we split between them we get two "soloble" that are easier to read.

    dentist = den + tist

    picnic = pic + nic

    trumpet = trum + pet
    Last edited by Janis.Y.Chen; Thu 31st March '16 at 8:45pm.
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  5. #5

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    1.

    can not
    cob web
    back pack
    sand box

    2.

    drop
    crash
    spr
    ing
    gum drop
    hun dred

    3.

    ten nis
    rab bit
    den tist
    pic nic
    trum pet

    6.

    cane
    bite
    rep tile
    mis take
    tad pole

    7.

    slow ly
    clear ly
    sharp ly

    8.

    car
    for
    her
    card
    form
    herd
    for est
    tar get
    Last edited by Janis.Y.Chen; Mon 25th April '16 at 2:32pm.
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  6. #6

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    11.

    me ter
    so lo

    12.

    ap ple
    can dle
    ta ble

    14.

    pa per

    15.

    cry
    fly
    can dy
    fun ny

    16.

    -tion
    -stion

    17.

    -less
    -ful

    18.

    fan tas tic
    car pen tor
    po ta to
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  7. #7

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Letter Sounds

    Consonant Sounds


    Consonants are the letters which stop or limit the flow of air from the throat in speech. These are the sounds, or phonemes, of single consonants:

    • /b/ sound as in bonfire, black, bathtub, and balcony
    • /d/ sound as in dry, draw, design, and duet
    • /f/ sound as in fossil, fail, frame, and fingerprint
    • /g/ sound as in greeting, grill, goose, and grapefruit
    • /h/ sound as in hail, hieroglyphics, hostage, and hit
    • /j/ sound as in magician, syringe, jeep, and message
    • /k/ sound as in key, knock, kangaroo, and kayak
    • /l/ sound as in lizard, learn, lamp, and library
    • /m/ sound as in mug, money, maze, and mechanical
    • /n/ sound as in night, newspaper, nightmare, and noodle
    • /p/ sound as in panda, pie, pen, and potato
    • /r/ sound as in rose, restaurant, run, and reporter
    • /s/ sound as in safe, sunset, sand, and seat
    • /t/ sound as in tile, thermometer, tongue, and toy
    • /v/ sound as in violin, volcano, vaccination, and vote
    • /w/ sound as in waterfall, wagon, windmill, and watch
    • /y/ sound as in yoke, yawn, yacht, and yoga
    • /z/ sound as in zebra, zoo, and zipper

    Sometimes the vowel u takes upon itself the consonant sound of w, as in quick or suave. This is usually the case when q is followed by u, as in quiet and quaint.

    Vowel Sounds

    A vowel is a sound made by the relatively free movement of air through the mouth, usually forming the main sound of a syllable. The vowels are a, e, i, o, and u.
    Each vowel has two sounds: a long sound and a short sound. The long sound is the same as its name. Every vowel also makes a third sound: the schwa. This is the sound of a vowel that is unstressed in an unstressed syllable. There are also some more advanced vowel sounds besides the long, short, and schwa. For instance, the a in father is different than the a in cat.
    When a single vowel letter is in the middle of a word (or syllable), it usually says its short sound (e.g., got, bed.) But there are many exceptions to this rule, such as irregular vowels. When a single vowel letter is in the end of a word (or syllable), it usually says its long sound (or its name), as in go and be. When two vowels go hand in hand in the same word (or syllable), the first vowel is usually long, and the second vowel is usually silent. e.g., bake makes the ay sound (long a) and the e is silent; goal makes the oh sound (long o) and the a is silent. But there are many exceptions to this rule, such as irregular vowels.
    The following is a list of vowel sounds, shown along with their diacritical marks:

    • Long a (ā) sound as in ape, snail, ache, explain, and reindeer
    • Long e (ē) sound as in eat, agony, needle, pianist, and electricity
    • Long i (ī) sound as in eye, cry, tightrope, tile, and violin
    • Long o (ō) sound as in oh, domino, ghost, pillow, and stethoscope
    • Long u (ū) sound as in you, salute, toothbrush, goose, boot, and costume
    • Short a (ă) sound as in at, taxi, anniversary, laboratory, and tackle
    • Short e (ĕ) sound as in elm, elevator, jellyfish, pentagon, and dentist
    • Short i (ĭ) sound as in it, gift, inflate, spinach, and cereal
    • Short o (ŏ) sound as in hop, camouflage, garage, chop, father, paw, and binoculars
    • Short u (ŭ) sound as in up, cut and subtract
    • Schwa (ə) sound as in about, item, gallop, and circus

    The letter y sometimes substitutes for i and is a vowel when it does so. Likewise, the vowel w sometimes substitutes for u and is considered a vowel when it does so. However, y sometimes appears as the only vowel in a syllable, such as in gym and why, whereas w never appears as a vowel all by itself. When w acts as a vowel, it always follows a (as in paw), e (as in new), or o (as in grow).
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  8. #8

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Consonants

    Consonants are letters that are not vowels. Specifically, consonants are speech sounds (phonemes) made by partially or completely blocking the vocal air stream, and letters (graphemes) that represents such sounds.
    When y is not acting as a vowel, it is a consonant. Most consonants have only one sound, but a few have multiple sounds. For instance, c can make both the /k/ and the /s/ sound.
    A comprehensive list of consonant sounds follows:

    • b makes the /b/ sound as in bat; also, when b follows m in the same syllable, it is silent as in lamb.
    • c makes the /k/ sound as in cat and the /s/ sound as in cease—see Spelling With C and G.
    • d makes the /d/ sound as in dog.
    • f makes the /f/ sound as in fat.
    • g makes the /g/ sound as in get, and the /j/ sound as in gem—see Spelling With C and G.
    • h makes the /h/ sound as in hat; also, sometimes h is silent, as in honesty.
    • j makes the /j/ sound as in jam.
    • k makes the /k/ sound as in kite.
    • l makes the /l/ sound as in lap, and the /lə/ sound as in glad and cycle.
    • m makes the /m/ sound as in mad.
    • n makes the /n/ sound as in nap.
    • p makes the /p/ sound as in park.
    • r makes the /r/ sound as in race. When r follows a vowel, it makes a special sound: see R-Controlled Vowels.
    • s makes the /s/ sound as in sit, and the /z/ sound as in has.
    • t makes the /t/ sound as in tap; also, sometimes t is silent, as in whistle.
    • v makes the /v/ sound as in van.
    • w makes the /w/ sound as in wet. w placed before a single vowel will usually modify its sound, as in wash.
    • x makes the /ks/ sound as in box, the /gs/ sound as in exact, and the /z/ sound as in xylophone.
    • y makes the /y/ sound as in yet. y can also act as a vowel.
    • z makes the /z/ sound as in zip.

    Note that the consonant q is almost always followed by the vowel u. The u in this case takes on the /w/ sound, so qu together make the /kw/ sound. In some French-derived words, -que makes the /k/ sound as in torque and plaque.
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  9. #9

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Short Vowels

    When a vowel is followed by a consonant, the vowel is short. The diacritical mark for a short vowel is called a breve (˘), which is in the shape of a downturned arc.
    A vowel is usually short when there is only one vowel in a word or syllable, as in cat, bed, and hot. However, there are exceptions to this rule, such as with irregular vowels.
    There is both a long and short sound to �oo�. The short sound appears as in the words book, booth, and took.
    The following is a list of short vowel sounds, shown along with their diacritical marks:

    • Short a (ă) sound as in at, taxi, anniversary, laboratory, and tackle
    • Short e (ĕ) sound as in elm, elevator, jellyfish, pentagon, and dentist
    • Short i (ĭ) sound as in it, gift, inflate, spinach, and cereal
    • Short o (ŏ) sound as in hop, camouflage, garage, chop, father, paw, and binoculars
    • Short u (ŭ) sound as in up, cut and subtract

    For a complete list of long, short, and other sounds, see letter sounds.
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

  10. #10

    Default Re: Learn English by Phonics

    Long Vowels

    A long vowel sound is the same as its name. The diacritical mark for a long vowel is called a macron (¯), which is in the shape of a line above the vowel.
    When a single vowel letter is in the end of a word (or syllable), it usually says its long sound (or its name), as in go and be. When two vowels go hand in hand in the same word (or syllable), the first vowel is usually long, and the second vowel is usually silent. e.g., bake makes the /ay/ sound (long a) and the e is silent; goal makes the /oh/ sound (long o) and the a is silent. However, there are many exceptions to this rule, such as with irregular vowels.
    When there are two adjacent vowels in a word, the first one is long and the second one is silent. The first vowel is marked with a long line and second one is crossed out. Examples of this rule are in coat, ride, and read.
    There is both a long and short sound to �oo�. The long sound appears as in the words boo, food, smooth, and moose.
    The following is a list of long vowel sounds, shown along with their diacritical marks:

    • Long a (ā) sound as in ape, snail, ache, explain, and reindeer
    • Long e (ē) sound as in eat, agony, needle, pianist, and electricity
    • Long i (ī) sound as in eye, cry, tightrope, tile, and violin
    • Long o (ō) sound as in oh, domino, ghost, pillow, and stethoscope
    • Long u (ū) sound as in you, salute, toothbrush, goose, boot, and costume

    For a complete list of long, short, and other sounds, see letter sounds.
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases

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